Synopses for Andrew Robbins’ Books

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Synopses
   
   for Andrew Robbins’ Books . . .
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Synopses
   
  for Andrew Robbins’ Books . . .
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The Rakkasans: A Vietnam Veteran’s Memoir [self-published, November 2017]. Grappling with heightened PTSD, yet driven to complete his telling, Robbins persevered, with the hope “of getting the monkey off my back, the demons out of my head.” With The Rakkasans, he delivers a candid, sensitive, insightful account of the pressures, horrors, and mishaps of modern warfare and a weighty chronicle of conscience that reads like a spy novel. Chapters crafted with courage and brilliance detail his 22 months in-country, including harrowing jungle combat, a spell in Long Binh Jail, and gripping serial brushes with black ops. The book begins with aspects of Robbins’ childhood, leading up to enlistment, boot camp, various training, and deployment. He recounts, as well, the aftermath years of physical pain and PTSD.

The volume contains six Appendices: a history of Vietnam; a brief biography of Ho Chi Minh; a dictionary of military terms; the Army military hierarchy of ranks; the structure of the 101st Airborne Division; and a list of 3rd/187th battalion commanders.
From Appendix C, Military Terminology:
       
“Rakkasans . . . [WWII] a name given by the Japanese to members of the 3rd/187 Infantry Regiment. The Japanese had no word for airborne soldiers and thus described the paratroopers as ‘falling down umbrella men’—a phrase that has stuck.”
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MORE Praise for The Rakkasans

Watch Robbin’s Witness to War
Oral History Interview
for the
50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War
Commemoration

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It Took My Breath Away: One Man’s Experience May Save Your Life (Bookman Publishing, July 2004) is an invaluable and diligently-researched work of nonfiction that brings to light how 3,000 essentially trapped office workers were, for months, exposed to asbestos—and just how easily this could happen to anyone.
       
“Toxic exposure cannot happen to me!” Those were the author’s words
before renovation of the Major General Emmett J. Bean Federal Center took his breath away. Robbins is not a person who passively waits for a serious problem to be addressed by “someone else.” At the Bean Center (where he worked for the Department of Defense), Robbins took an active role in uncovering the shocking truth behind the raining asbestos, poorly addressed precautions, and flawed abatement measures.
       
It Took My Breath Away reveals how and why the Bean Center workforce was subjected to deadly fibers and toxins—carcinogens long-documented as causing asthma, COPD, a myriad of lung cancers, and Mesothelioma. Peppered with useful facts and tips, Robbins’ book offers clear and vital information about proper testing and analysis, safety precautions, and methods of removal. Had this book been available during the Bean Center crisis, it would have enabled those affected to react immediately to protect themselves. In addition, Robbins leaves a chronicle for surviving family members to pursue litigation against the perpetrators.
       
Reading about this one man’s experience could save
your life!
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The Rakkasans book cover
The Rakkasans: A Vietnam Veteran’s Memoir [self-published, November 2017]. Grappling with heightened PTSD, yet driven to complete his telling, Robbins persevered in the hope “of getting the monkey off my back, the demons out of my head.” With The Rakkasans, he delivers a candid, sensitive, insightful account of the pressures, horrors, and mishaps of modern warfare and a weighty chronicle of conscience that reads like a spy novel. Chapters crafted with courage and brilliance detail his 22 months in-country, including harrowing jungle combat, a spell in Long Binh Jail, and intense serial brushes with black ops. The book begins with aspects of Robbins’ childhood, leading up to enlistment, boot camp, various training, and deployment. He recounts, as well, the aftermath years of physical pain and PTSD.
The volume contains six Appendices: a history of Vietnam, a brief biography of Ho Chi Minh, a dictionary of military terms, the Army military hierarchy of ranks, the structure of the 101st Airborne Division, and a list of 3rd/187th battalion commanders.
From Appendix C, Military Terminology:
       
“Rakkasans . . . [WWII] a name given by the Japanese to members of the 3rd/187 Infantry Regiment. The Japanese had no word for airborne soldiers and thus described the paratroopers as ‘falling down umbrella men’—a phrase that has stuck.”
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MORE Praise for The Rakkasans

Watch Robbin’s Witness to War
Oral History Interview
for the
50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War
Commemoration

Stacks Image 411
It Took My Breath Away book cover
It Took My Breath Away: One Man’s Experience May Save Your Life (Bookman Publishing, July 2004) is an invaluable and diligently-researched work of nonfiction that brings to light how 3,000 essentially trapped office workers were, for months, exposed to asbestos—and just how easily this could happen to anyone.
       
“Toxic exposure cannot happen to me!” Those were the author’s words
before renovation of the Major General Emmett J. Bean Federal Center took his breath away. Robbins is not a person who passively waits for a serious problem to be addressed by “someone else.” At the Bean Center (where he worked for the Department of Defense), Robbins took an active role in uncovering the shocking truth behind the raining asbestos, poorly addressed precautions, and flawed abatement measures.
       
It Took My Breath Away reveals how and why the Bean Center workforce was subjected to deadly fibers and toxins—carcinogens long-documented as causing asthma, COPD, a myriad of lung cancers, and Mesothelioma. Peppered with useful facts and tips, Robbins’ book offers clear and vital information about proper testing and analysis, safety precautions, and methods of removal. Had this book been available during the Bean Center crisis, it would have enabled those affected to react immediately to protect themselves. In addition, Robbins leaves a chronicle for surviving family members to pursue litigation against the perpetrators.
       
Reading about this one man’s experience could save
your life!
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The Rakkasans book cover
The Rakkasans: A Vietnam Veteran’s Memoir [self-published, November 2017]. Grappling with heightened PTSD, yet driven to complete his telling, Robbins persevered in the hope “of getting the monkey off my back, the demons out of my head.” With The Rakkasans, he delivers a candid, sensitive, insightful account of the pressures, horrors, and mishaps of modern warfare and a weighty chronicle of conscience that reads like a spy novel. Chapters crafted with courage and brilliance detail his 22 months in-country, including harrowing jungle combat, a spell in Long Binh Jail, and intense serial brushes with black ops. The book begins with aspects of Robbins’ childhood, leading up to enlistment, boot camp, various training, and deployment. He recounts, as well, the aftermath years of physical pain and PTSD.
      
 
The volume contains six Appendices: a history of Vietnam; a brief biography of Ho Chi Minh; a dictionary of military terms; the Army military hierarchy of ranks; the structure of the 101st Airborne Division; and a list of 3rd/187th battalion commanders.
From Appendix C, Military Terminology:
       
“Rakkasans . . . [WWII] a name given by the Japanese to members of the 3rd/187 Infantry Regiment. The Japanese had no word for airborne soldiers and thus described the paratroopers as ‘falling down umbrella men’—a phrase that has stuck.”
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MORE Praise for The Rakkasans

Watch Robbins’ Witness to War
Oral History Interview
for the
50th Anniversary
of the
Vietnam War Commemoration

Stacks Image 409
It Took My Breath Away book cover
It Took My Breath Away: One Man’s Experience May Save Your Life (Bookman Publishing, July 2004) is an invaluable and diligently-researched work of nonfiction that brings to light how 3,000 essentially trapped office workers were, for months, exposed to asbestos—and just how easily this could happen to anyone.
       “Toxic exposure cannot happen to me!” Those were the author’s words
before renovation of the Major General Emmett J. Bean Federal Center took his breath away. Robbins is not a person who passively waits for a serious problem to be addressed by “someone else.” At the Bean Center (where he worked for the Department of Defense), Robbins took an active role in uncovering the shocking truth behind the raining asbestos, poorly addressed precautions, and flawed abatement measures.
       
It Took My Breath Away reveals how and why the Bean Center workforce was subjected to deadly fibers and toxins—carcinogens long-documented as causing asthma, COPD, a myriad of lung cancers, and Mesothelioma. Peppered with useful facts and tips, Robbins’ book offers clear and vital information about proper testing and analysis, safety precautions, and methods of removal. Had this book been available during the Bean Center crisis, it would have enabled those affected to react immediately to protect themselves. In addition, Robbins leaves a chronicle for surviving family members to pursue litigation against the perpetrators.
       Reading about this one man’s experience could save
your life!
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© 2018 by Author Andrew Robbins   •   All Rights Reserved 
Website design by
RapidRiver.us

© 2018 by Author Andrew Robbins   •   All Rights Reserved 
Website design by
RapidRiver.us

© 2018 by Author Andrew Robbins   •   All Rights Reserved 
Website design by
RapidRiver.us